Hastymail2

Hastymail2 is an Open Source IMAP webmail client written in PHP. Our focus is compliance, usability, security, and speed.
     

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Code Updates for October 11

    RC7 has been out for a while now and things are looking good. Feedback has resulted in a handful of new features, many fixes, and three new plugins. The new plugins are a uuencode plugin that decodes uuencoded messages, an auto-complete address plugin for the compose page, and an IMAP quota plugin that displays quota information. All could use more testing in different environments (I posted an SVN snapshot for anybody interested in doing so, link below). Here is the complete list of updates and fixes since RC7 was released:

Code Updates for February 25

    It has been a busy week for Hastymail. The updates and additions are all over the code, the most notable being a plugin system. The system is not complete but so far there are 2 limited but functional plugins, and quite a bit of first draft documentation to go with them. Another notable update is functional searching, including advanced search abilities.  So without further ado here is what's new in Hastymail this week.

Code Updates for March 3

    Yet another busy week for Hastymail updates, primarily to the new plugin system. More testing has resulted in some important fixes and improvements. Over all I think the system is proving to be efficient and down right powerful. The API for plugins continues to expand as more methods are added to the tools class and hooks are added to the core code. Plugins can now use a shared database connection, have their own AJAX callbacks, insert Javascript into page headers, even interact with the IMAP server, all using the documented tools class methods. Aside from plugins we also have some updates to the message view, including image attachment thumbnails and previous and next links that walk through the viewable parts of a message. Read on for the full list.

Code Updates for March 10

    It was a bit slower than average for Hastymail development this week, though as I look over the SVN commits there are definitely some updates worth mentioning.  Aside from the normal fixes and tweaks all over the code the primary areas of development for the last week were the plugin system,  Exchange compatibility, and a brand new contacts page based on a Vcard type system.

Code Updates for March 24

    The past week was not the most productive for Hastymail development, but definitely an improvement over the last few. There are a handful of fixes in various places as well as continued work on the new configuration and plugin systems. Considering how much Hastymail2 can already do, I am pleased with how compact the codebase is. The overall organization of the code uses a system I have been developing for a long time. A primary focus is limiting php include size, both through re-usable and efficient code but also by excluding files from being included when not required by the page request. For example if $_POST is empty a 1500 line include file that contains methods for dealing with submitted forms is not included.

Hastymail2 Release Candidate 2 is Now Available

    We are happy to announce the second release candidate of Hastymail2. The changes since RC 1 are all over, and while mostly fixes some are "missing" features that did not require major code changes to implement. New development has shifted to plugins as we try to solidify the core code as we near our first stable release. This release has 3 new plugins worth checking out:

Plugin round-up

   Corny news title I know, but I think it is time to take a moment and emphasize how much of a significant impact enabling plugins in Hastymail2 has on the use of the software. Before starting the first Hastymail I was involved in Squirrelmail development. One of the great aspects of that software at the time was the plugin system. It added so much to it's usability that I planned and eventually added a plugin API to Hastymail. Luckily I was able to avoid some of the problems with the Squirrelmail API, and now after writing over a dozen plugins I can say that it really was worth the effort. With a plugin system it has been possible to add some really cool features to Hastymail without cluttering the core code, and without compromising the basic functionality (a plugin can always be disabled if it behaves badly). Most of the useful and cool plugins are DISABLED by default, so unless you get past line 500 of the config file you may be missing out on some of best new Hastymail features (it is not an exaggeration, the plugin section starts at line 537). There are 19 plugins that ship with Hastymail and most are well tested and have a lot of features. Here is a quick breakdown in no particular order of what plugins can do to the Hastymail experience:

Hastymail Plugins

   One of the major problems with the first version of Hastymail was the lack of a plugin system. Many suggested options were rejected because of the strict requirements that the core code follow certain principles (like no javascript requirement). With a plugin system we can loosen up the strict requirement a bit and allow plugins to have their own rules, since they can be disabled if they cause problems. I was hesitant at first to design a plugin system, but I got some great ideas from the IRC channel regulars, and ended building plugin support into Hastymail 2. I am happy to say it was both fun to build and fun to create plugins. Most of the interesting plugins are disabled by default, so if admins don't get that far in the config file (it is a long config file) they might be missing out on some additional features. Another problem is that I am the only one building plugins, and while I think the system is functional and easy to use, I am the only one who has used it :)

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